Author Archive: Patrick

Costa Mesa Community Run, April 22

Communications Support, Saturday, April 22, 2017

The 10th Annual Costa Mesa Community Run will take place April 22nd at Fairview Park. This event features one of the best 5K and 10K courses you’ll find in Southern California. The run raises money for Costa Mesa’s schools.

MESAC provides communications support staff through out the course and provides logistical communications, including coordination should a runner need medical attention or just assistance off the course. MESAC also provides the staff with business band radios to improve set up, course coordination, event management and tear down.

The 10k course takes the runners on an out-and-back course through Fairview Park, onto the Santa Ana River Trail towards the beach, and then back to Estancia High School for a stadium finish.

2016 Community Run Video

https://www.facebook.com/costamesacommunityrun/

 

 

SurfCityLogo

MESAC provides communicators for HB Surf City Marathon

Sunday, February 5, 2017:   For the third year, MESAC volunteers provided additional communicators to support the Huntington Beach RACES (Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service) Group under the Huntington Beach Fire Department. The RACES volunteers provide health, safety and welfare communications on the marathon race course, at medical tents, in support vehicles and at the police/fire/lifeguard unified command.

Run Surf City

Surf City Facebook Page

MESAC Participates in Radio Rodeo, November 15

MESAC personnel took the Costa Mesa Police Mobile Command Vehicle (MCV) to Huntington Beach to participate in the Southern California communications exercise known as the “Radio Rodeo”

On November 15, 2016, public safety personnel from all over southern California participated in the annual Radio Rodeo, a training and testing exercise for mobile communications vehicles.  During the exercise, specific radio channels are tested in roll call fashion.    It is likely our Orange County participants were familiar with the 800 MHz channels tested, but may not have been as familiar  with  the channels  tested in  the VHF and UHF bands. 

Unlike a typical first responder vehicle, many have more than an 800 MHz radio.  In general, public safety agencies across the nation operate on one (or more) radio bands, commonly called VHF Low Band (30-50 MHz), VHF High Band (150-170 MHz), UHF (450-512 MHz), as well  as the band familiar  to Orange County, 800 MHz (our Countywide  Coordinated Communications  System (CCCS).   Since the VHF and UHF channels are not used day to day, the annual Radio Rodeo allows an opportunity for testing these interoperable resources.